Eric Lefkofsky sees future of cancer treatment in genomic data

Eric Lefkofsky has become one of the nation’s most widely respected tech entrepreneurs. After founding Groupon, a company that allows individuals to become part of groups eligible for deep discounts on everything from pizza to hotel rooms, he went on to have a successful second career developing a string of successful startups.

But then, in 2013, Lefkofsky’s wife got a terrible diagnosis. She had advanced breast cancer. The Lefkofsky’s both put their heads down and charged the disease full-on. Over the course of the next year, Lefkofsky accompanied his wife to dozens of appointments. In the end, his wife was cured of the disease and, today, is a cancer survivor.

But Lefkofksy left the process of cancer treatment with the deep impression that things were not all well with the state of modern oncology. He noted that many of the oncologists who saw his wife did not have ready access to the best data and analytics, crucial tools that could provide key information to the treatment process. Lefkofsky decided to research ways in which all of the sources of oncologically relevant data could be put into the hands of oncologist, in ways that were digestible and informative to the decision makers.

In 2016 Eric Lefkofsky founded Tempus, a company dedicated to the provision of oncologists with key intelligence, which is mined from a vast number of primary data sources. The idea behind Tempus is to create a sort of on-demand meta-study capability, where interesting questions that oncologists may have regarding patient cohorts  treatment regimes can be answered in real time.

One of the most potent sources of largely untapped data is the human genome itself. Tempus is creating a system that will be able to use the genome of cancer patients to find relationships between genetics, comorbid conditions and data from studies and how these things affect treatment outcomes. Within the next decade, Lefkofsky sees the rapidly diminishing cost of sequencing the human genome as being the main driver of medical advances, with practically every future patient cohort having their entire genome completely sequenced. This will provide a level of understanding previously never imagined.

To learn more visit @: www.insidephilanthropy.com/guide-to-individual-donors/eric-lefkofsky.html

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